Tea Time Mocada public installtion digital print on vinyl 36" x 67" 2016   Statement Tea Time, by Theresa Chromati, references commonplace traditions as the passive residue of colonization. Yet, as the tea is taken “black,” this specific practice is recontextualized to offer a space of affirmation, solidarity, protection, and endearment. The multicolored domestic space is pungently rendered, suggesting it as a robust site of reflection on identity and social relationships. Masked black figures dressed in teacups and teapots are either seen in defense, collectively lifting a carton of milk out of their private interior, or in repose indulging in one another’s nourishment. Tea embraces a double-meaning, referencing the hot drink and its healing abilities, as well as the informal use that indicates possession of a highly coveted piece of information. The five-panel work meditates further through accompanying audio by Pangelica, with Chromati lending a bold, self-assured voice to proclaim, “I got more than enough,” against sounds of crying lambs, gas escaping bubbles, and an ambient tropical storm.  Tea Time by Theresa Chromati was supported in part by public funds from The New York City Department of Cultural Affairs (DCA) in partnership with The City Council, New York State Council on the Arts, and the Lambent Foundation.    

Tea Time

Mocada public installtion

digital print on vinyl

36" x 67"

2016

 

Statement

Tea Time, by Theresa Chromati, references commonplace traditions as the passive residue of colonization. Yet, as the tea is taken “black,” this specific practice is recontextualized to offer a space of affirmation, solidarity, protection, and endearment. The multicolored domestic space is pungently rendered, suggesting it as a robust site of reflection on identity and social relationships. Masked black figures dressed in teacups and teapots are either seen in defense, collectively lifting a carton of milk out of their private interior, or in repose indulging in one another’s nourishment. Tea embraces a double-meaning, referencing the hot drink and its healing abilities, as well as the informal use that indicates possession of a highly coveted piece of information. The five-panel work meditates further through accompanying audio by Pangelica, with Chromati lending a bold, self-assured voice to proclaim, “I got more than enough,” against sounds of crying lambs, gas escaping bubbles, and an ambient tropical storm. 

Tea Time by Theresa Chromati was supported in part by public funds from The New York City Department of Cultural Affairs (DCA) in partnership with The City Council, New York State Council on the Arts, and the Lambent Foundation.

 

 

       

 

 

 

 

Install photo of BBW solo exhibition Platform Gallery Baltimore 2016 Statement "BBW" stands for "big beautiful women". And I agree we have assets that are big and beautiful, but there is  more to them then just bounce. Could it be that The B's in this acronym point to other descriptors? The artwork seen in BBW, with it's leisure scenes of black women enjoying life with and without interruptions....just living, reflects on the many "B" words that weave themselves in and out of the varied narratives of Black women: black, besties, bold, brave, bodies, baes, benefits, brains, bliss, blending, bruised, and blame. Just to name a few."

Install photo of BBW solo exhibition

Platform Gallery Baltimore

2016

Statement

"BBW" stands for "big beautiful women". And I agree we have assets that are big and beautiful, but there is  more to them then just bounce. Could it be that The B's in this acronym point to other descriptors? The artwork seen in BBW, with it's leisure scenes of black women enjoying life with and without interruptions....just living, reflects on the many "B" words that weave themselves in and out of the varied narratives of Black women: black, besties, bold, brave, bodies, baes, benefits, brains, bliss, blending, bruised, and blame. Just to name a few."

photo of STOP! Someone's in Here (Woman Takes a Shit) New Image Art Los Angeles 2017 Statement The women depicted in these works are free; frolicking, stomping, laughing, and lounging. Within this universe, fear, hate, ignorance, self-doubt, and anxiety are symbolized by various home structures, while these women occupy the rooftop above these limitations. These robust women also capture pride through comforting partnerships and support for one another. Their bodies possess armor in the form of voluptuous pussy lips, protruding nipples, and masked faces, taking delight in themselves and one another. “My ideal reality would be an environment above every rooftop, where black women always have the space to be all parts of themselves.”

photo of STOP! Someone's in Here (Woman Takes a Shit)

New Image Art Los Angeles

2017

Statement

The women depicted in these works are free; frolicking, stomping, laughing, and lounging. Within this universe, fear, hate, ignorance, self-doubt, and anxiety are symbolized by various home structures, while these women occupy the rooftop above these limitations. These robust women also capture pride through comforting partnerships and support for one another. Their bodies possess armor in the form of voluptuous pussy lips, protruding nipples, and masked faces, taking delight in themselves and one another.

“My ideal reality would be an environment above every rooftop, where black women always have the space to be all parts of themselves.”